“Made in Spain and born in Australia”, Olga has lived in the mid-north of South Australia for over forty years. Resilient, strong and family-orientated, Olga is a twin, a mother, a grandmother and a staff member at the Crystal Brook Primary School, and is happiest when spending time with her family. 

Olga’s greatest concern when it comes to work in rural industries is the fatigue of those required to work long hours – particularly during harvest – and heeds the advice to make sure you’re getting enough sleep, to always ensure that someone knows where you are, and that all phones and radios remain in good working condition. Olga also encourages rural women to look to one another for support, and to openly share knowledge and experiences.

How would you describe yourself in three words?

Resilient, strong and family orientated. 

What's one achievement you are most proud of?

Raising my two children.

What makes you truly happy?

My family.

What do you love the most about being a rural woman?

The friendships and country living.

Tell me about a time when you felt worried about your own or someone else’s health, safety or wellbeing on the farm, boat or in some other aspect of rural life.

Working late and long nights when exhausted, particularly whilst on tractors, trucks or any other heavy machinery.

What practical things did or could you, your partner and / or others do to prevent someone from getting hurt?

Getting enough sleep and letting people or family know where you are in case something goes wrong.

 Make sure phones and radios are in good working order.

"Make sure that phones and radios are in good working order."

Is there a time, place or scenario when your partner / workers are more willing to make changes to the way work is done? 

I would like to think so!

If you could give any advice to another rural woman about work health and safety in rural industries, about influencing change in business - or just in general - what would it be?

Talk and share experiences with one another. 

Encourage and talk to other women about the big issue of safety in the workplace or at home.

Share your story!

Everybody knows someone who’s been hurt at work in rural industries. 

No matter what role you fill, where you come from or how long you’ve lived in a rural or regional area, we are ALL responsible for looking out for the health, safety and wellbeing of ourselves, and of others.

Thirty years ago, no-one wore seatbelts. Today we do it without even thinking about it.

Join the conversation today.

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